Learn – Social Media

SOCIAL MEDIA

TWITTER

Two weeks after eligibility was expanded, Georgia Dept. of Corrections will begin vaccinating everyone in their custody. More than 1,500 incarcerated people were vaccinated in phase 1A, but starting next week, GDC will begin receiving 2,000 doses a week. https://t.co/ywA8CVMFKx

At trial, the prosecution told the jury they don't even "have to be 51% sure" to convict, and the defense also failed to call expert medical witnesses.

The GA Supreme Court overturned their convictions due to ineffective assistance of counsel last year. https://t.co/QWfwCjUNEu

The GA Senate passed a trio of bills compensating 3 wrongly convicted soldiers for the 25 years they spent in prison for a murder they didn't commit: $1M each, doled out 20 over years–only a third of what they would have made if they'd been able to retire. https://t.co/JUFLOnkRwD

HB 255, which ensures cases involving sexual assault evidence move forward and perpetrators are held accountable by creating a tracking system of rape kits from initial collection to receipt, storage and analysis, is headed to the governor's desk. #gapol https://t.co/zKrO50s1DC

Proposed ethics revisions not only increase penalties for prosecutors who withhold exculpatory evidence, but also oblige prosecutors to proactively seek to remedy wrongful convictions in their jurisdictions. #gapol https://t.co/dHKOIE8HXE

Georgia banned the execution of people with intellectual disabilities in 1988, and yet only 1 of 379 death penalty defendants have been successful in that defense. Lawyers for Rodney Young say the state’s burden of proof "makes it all but impossible." https://t.co/6q16ecZIhq
FACEBOOK
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
The Bureau of Justice Statistics estimated the U.S. spends $81 billion a year on prison staffing and meeting the most basic needs of nearly 2 million incarcerated Americans.

But what support is available once a person gets out? Often, not much.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
After fighting 44 years for his innocence, Ronnie Long is now fighting to be fairly compensated for the years stolen by wrongful conviction.

Long was pardoned last December, and the state was ordered to pay him $50,000 per year in prison – but an old state statue caps the amount at $750,000. That means Long gets nothing for more than two-thirds of the time he was behind bars.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
Albert and Ashley Debelbot were convicted of murder in the death of their infant daughter, who died three days after arriving home from the hospital.

At trial, the prosecution told the jury they don't even "have to be 51% sure" to convict and didn't specify which parent allegedly killed the baby. The defense also failed to call expert medical witnesses.

After the Supreme Court of Georgia overturned their convictions due to ineffective assistance of counsel last year, the Columbus couple will not be retried.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
The state Senate passed a trio of bills to compensate three wrongly convicted soldiers for the 25 years they spent in prison for a Savannah murder they didn't commit.

It took three years to garner support for the bills, which allot $1 million each, doled out monthly over 20 years–only a third of what they would have made if they'd been able to retire.

Still, without any kind of statutory compensation law, the fight for an objective and reliable statutory compensation process continues.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
The bill that ensures cases involving sexual assault evidence move forward and perpetrators are held accountable is headed to the governor's desk.

The Georgia Senate unanimously approved HB 255, which would create a tracking system of rape kits from initial collection to receipt, storage and analysis.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
Months after electing its first Black district attorney, the three-county Augusta Judicial Circuit is down to two after Gov. Kemp signed SB 9 into law Thursday. The bill allows Columbia its own separate judicial circuit.

The split–which could cost Georgia $1.4M annually–will require a new district attorney’s office, new public defenders, and potentially additional court staff to perform the work currently done in Augusta.