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In light of #DennisPerry's release, Exec. Director Clare Gilbert talks to @ZachLashway on @wjxt4 about the many unique barriers to fighting for GA's imprisoned innocent: "Days like this are rare, and they're also what keep us going through the rough times." https://t.co/cbxQhtzYWL

GA’s punishment for prosecutorial misconduct—like withholding exculpatory evidence—is among the weakest in the country. The maximum is public reprimand.

“I think it’s time that we have a serious discussion in this state about regulating prosecutors as we do judges.”

The Say Good Pie to Racism bake sale is already sold out—and it hasn’t even started yet!

Follow Say Good Pie to Racism signs to pick up your preordered pies TODAY, 12-3 p.m., at 337 Elizabeth St in Inman Park.

100% of proceeds benefit GIP. Thanks for the overwhelming support! https://t.co/jjPiXFhwg3
GaInnocence photo

“We are grateful that the Court has ordered Dennis Perry’s release, and we are thrilled to welcome Dennis Perry home to his family after twenty years spent wrongfully imprisoned for crimes he did not commit." https://t.co/VEv5F6FLjq

“Two years ago, I told my wife I was going to pray myself out of here,” said our client #DennisPerry, moments after walking out of Coffee Correctional Facility, where he spent two decades wrongfully imprisoned.

“And that’s what I’ve done.” https://t.co/f56nnBOqu1
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Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
"The work that we face, in Georgia in particular, is so challenging. There are so many barriers to getting somebody out of prison based on the grounds of innocence... It takes years and years, as you can see," says Clare Gilbert, our Executive Director.

"Days like this are rare, and they're also what keep us going through the rough times."
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia’s punishment for prosecutors who violate codes of conduct, such as withholding exculpatory evidence from the defense, is among the weakest in the country. The maximum punishment is a public reprimand.

“The situation in Georgia in terms of monitoring and deterring prosecutorial misconduct is completely inadequate,” according to Clark D. Cunningham, a Georgia State University law school professor.

Richard Hyde, a member of the state’s judicial watchdog agency, concurs: “I think it’s time that we have a serious discussion in this state about regulating prosecutors as we do judges.”
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
The inaugural Say Good Pie to Racism bake sale is ALREADY sold out—and it hasn’t even started yet! It’s also the last day to snag a T-shirt. 100% of proceeds go to GIP.

Follow the “Say Good Pie to Racism” signs to 337 Elizabeth Street to pick up your pies, TODAY 12 p.m. until 3 p.m. Thank you for the overwhelming support!
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia's maximum punishment for prosecutors who violate codes of conduct, such as by withholding exculpatory evidence from the defense, is among the weakest in the nation: public reprimand.

“The situation in Georgia in terms of monitoring and deterring prosecutorial misconduct is completely inadequate,” according to Clark D. Cunningham, a Georgia State University law school professor.

Richard Hyde, a member of the state’s judicial watchdog agency, concurs: “I think it’s time that we have a serious discussion in this state about regulating prosecutors as we do judges.”
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
“Two years ago, I told my wife I was going to pray myself out of here,” said our client Dennis Perry, moments after walking out of Coffee Correctional Facility, after two decades wrongfully imprisoned. “And that’s what I’ve done.”
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
“We are grateful that the Court has ordered Dennis Perry’s release, and we are thrilled to welcome Dennis Perry home to his family after twenty years spent wrongfully imprisoned for crimes he did not commit."