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3 yrs ago GIP & @innocence secured rape kit DNA testing that showed Ron Jacobsen's innocence. 1.5 yrs ago Ron's conviction was overturned, after 28 yrs wrongful imprisonment. He's still in jail.

Free if PG. $500,000 bail for maintaining innocence. https://t.co/5B7O6ZlYiL

We're only 7 days away from #Election2020, and @lyft is partnering with @LetsFreeAmerica to provide rides to the polls for formerly incarcerated voters in Atlanta, between now and #ElectionDay.

Visit https://t.co/BxFsqFYiSy for more information on how to get a ride to #VOTE. https://t.co/bfxmWpk5mW
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“You watch somebody die and it stays with you forever,” said Stan Allridge, who was football captain, part of the honor society, on his way to college, and only 18 years old when he witnessed the first of two older brothers executed by the state of Texas. https://t.co/nX0pksRtDg

Experts say recent crackdowns by NYPD's Strategic Response Group, the antiterrorism/protest unit, is the most brutal suppression of protests in years. But many of its officers are subject of misconduct allegations, including a supervisor with 32 complaints. https://t.co/UDM3oGnfun

Massachusetts prosecutors are ramping up efforts to keep tabs on problem officers: "If we have to keep this information from the public in order to preserve a perception that officers are categorically honest, that’s not serving the interest of justice." https://t.co/egqYOtckk1

How can you help in our mission to end wrongful conviction in Georgia? The short answer: #VOTE!

According to @exonerationlist, 54% of known #wrongfulconvictions involved misconduct by officials – many of them elected, so #getoutandvote early & in person if you can! https://t.co/ezsBxrTEum
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Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
It's been over 3 years since GIP & Innocence Project secured DNA testing of a rape kit that showed Ron Jacobsen's innocence. It's been 18 months since we helped overturn Ron's conviction. Yet Ron sits Newton County's jail awaiting a new trial, despite that he's already been wrongfully imprisoned for 30 years.

What does the presumption of innocence mean in Newton County, Georgia, on a case where the DA offered immediate release if Ron, who is indigent, would just please plead guilty? It means you sit in jail. For years. Even after DNA evidence excludes you from the rape kit, and even after the crime survivor originally asserted that you did not commit the crime. It means the local DA asks the judge for a $50,000 bail to keep you in jail, and the local Judge instead imposes TEN TIMES that: $500,000. It means the local bail bonding company stands to pocket roughly $55,000.

“Ron’s case is a complete tragedy and a travesty,” said Amanda Palmer, whose trial firm now represents Jacobsen pro bono with the IP. Click here if you'd like to contribute to a private (non-tax deductible) fundraiser to help free Ron Jacobsen to continue fighting for his innocence from beyond the jail cell: https://bit.ly/2G4NvSR
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
Only seven days out from Election Day, Lyft is partnering with FreeAmerica to provide rides to the polls for formerly incarcerated voters in Atlanta, between now and Election Day.

Visit lyft.com/invite/FREETHEVOTE for more information on how to get a ride to #VOTE and tell your friends in Alabama, New Orleans, Florida, Detroit, NYC, and Houston.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
The NYPD's Strategic Response Group is the so-called anti-terrorism and protest tactical unit best known for its run-ins with protesters. As it turns out, many of the officers that comprise it are subjects of significant misconduct allegations.

Using videos from early June protests and two weeks of sustained clashes with demonstrators in September, The Appeal was able to identify 62 officers. Of those, 46 had complaint histories with the Civilian Complaint Review Board.

42 officers racked up 142 abuse of authority complaints. 35 were accused of excessive force, five had allegations of offensive language. And 14 supervisors had multiple misconduct allegations, including one with 32 complaints.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
“You watch somebody die and it stays with you forever,” said Stan Allridge, who was captain of the football team, member of the honor society, on his way to college, and only 18 when he witnessed the first of two brothers executed by the state of Texas.

At his second brother's trial, jurors only had to answer whether the crime deliberate and the defendant posted a “future threat.” A yes to both mandated a death sentence, the possibility of rehabilitation didn’t matter.

Although “future dangerousness” was debunked in 1989 by extensive research, people convicted on the theory are still being put to death, like Billy Joe Wardlow, who was executed this July after a months-long pause due to COVID-19.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
As we work to free Georgia's wrongfully convicted, the most common question we get asked is how someone can help. The shortest answer? #VOTE!

Ending wrongful conviction for good is on the ballot. According to The National Registry of Exonerations, 54% of known wrongful convictions involved misconduct by officials, many of whom were elected.

We know you hear this all the time, but we're only 11 days away from what could be the most pivotal election of our time. Join GIP staff, interns, friends, and family ahead of #election2020 and vote – early and in person if you can!
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
Amid a national reckoning over law enforcement misconduct and a recent ruling from the top court, prosecutors in Massachusetts are reexamining efforts to keep tabs on problem police officers.

According to records, district attorneys have identified at least 350 current and former officers with past accusations of lying and various types of misconduct. And just two weeks ago, a newly created watchlist of 136 current and former officers.

"If we have to keep this information from the public in order to preserve a perception that officers are categorically honest, that’s not serving the interest of justice."