Learn – Social Media

SOCIAL MEDIA

TWITTER

Police were under pressure to find a sole Black male perpetrator assaulting mostly White women. According to @exonerationlist, such cases are a small minority and yet constitute half of sexual assault exonerations involving eyewitness misidentifications. https://t.co/HtCnXeF6G7

How did a jury convict Terry Talley on so little evidence?

Because he is yet another tragic example of how “presumption of innocence” and “proof beyond a reasonable doubt” mean different things to jurors depending on the race of the defendant. https://t.co/ojoEnnnGvO

Here's a timeline cleanse for your Friday evening: Terry, reunited with his loving family after 40 long years. Moments like these never get old. https://t.co/7VTpF81Tmp GaInnocence photo

When you have a confident eyewitness & officials intent to convict, science & common sense are subordinated to a compelling narrative that people simply want to believe. That’s how Terry Talley ended up wrongly convicted of several crimes he didn’t commit. https://t.co/nWkNgXT708

"I think the police clearly have a duty to review and open cases where there are compelling facts that indicate either previous evidence examination processes may have been unreliable or undependable," said LaGrange Police Chief Lou Dekmar https://t.co/z0c2dJOVEJ

When Terry left for a police interview in 1981, his family had no idea that it would be 40 long years before he returned. Now, watching his own story on TV, he's exactly where he belongs: at home, surrounded by his loving family, finally free. https://t.co/XAHBzBUtZ4 GaInnocence photo
FACEBOOK
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
Terry Talley spent 40 years wrongly imprisoned for not one, but multiple crimes he didn’t commit, despite no physical or reliable evidence tying him to the crime and based solely on the identification of White victims and witnesses.

According to @exonerationlist, a Black person convicted of sexual assault is three-and-a-half times more likely to be innocent than a White person convicted of sexual assault.

So, how does it happen? The answer lies in unreliable eyewitness identification, a blinding determination by the State to convict, and systemic racial bias.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
According to The National Registry of Exonerations, assaults on White women by Black men are a small minority of all sexual assaults in the US, but they constitute half of sexual assault exonerations involving eyewitness misidentifications.

When you have a confident eyewitness and officials intent to convict, science and common sense are subordinated to a compelling narrative that, for whatever reason, people simply want to believe.

That’s how Terry Talley ended up wrongfully convicted of not one, but multiple sexual assaults he didn’t commit.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
Here's a timeline cleanse for your Friday evening: Terry, reunited with his loving family after nearly four decades. Moments like these never get old.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
How does an innocent Black man get convicted of a series of brutally violent crimes he didn't commit?

The answer lies in unreliable eyewitness identification, blinding determination by the State to convict, and systemic racial bias. Add to that an under-resourced public defender system, set in the 1980s Deep South, and you have an infallible recipe for wrongful conviction.
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
The future for Terry is bright, but there's a long road ahead. In GA, there's no statutory compensation for years lost to wrongful conviction, leaving exonerees like Terry on their own, with virtually no support from the State, to rebuild.

Want to support by donating to him directly? Terry still has a lot to do to get settled into freedom, like setting up an ID and a bank account, so we will share his personal fundraiser as soon as it’s available. In the meantime, spread the word that Georgia needs a statutory compensation law!
Georgia Innocence Project
Georgia Innocence Project
"I think the police clearly have a duty to review and open cases where there are compelling facts that indicate either previous evidence examination processes may have been unreliable or undependable," said LaGrange Police Chief Lou Dekmar.

Through his partnership, and with support from the Coweta Judicial Circuit District Attorney, GIP secured not just one, but four exonerations and freedom for Terry Talley, who spent 40 years in prison for crimes he did not commit.